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Friday, 25 October 2013

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Flashing the SD card



Many vendors sell SD cards with the operating system pre-installed; for some
people this may be the best way to get started. Even if it isn’t the latest release
you can easily upgrade once you get the Pi booted up and on the Internet.
   
     Raspbian also has a network installer(click here). To use this tool, you need to
put the installer files on a SD Card (formatted as FAT32, which is typical for these
cards) and then boot up the Pi with the card inserted. The catch is that you’ll
need to be connected to the Internet for this to work.

Different OS can be installed for Pi....such  as Noobs, Raspbian , arch linux ....etc . 
All of these are linux based OS.
http://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads

The operating system is distributed as a disk image, which is a bit-for-bit
 representation of how the data should be written to the SD card.
Note that you can’t just drag the disk image onto the SD Card; you’ll need to
make a bit-for-bit copy of the image. You’ll need a card writer and a disk image
utility; any inexpensive card writer will do. The instructions vary depending
on the OS you’re running. Unzip the image file (you should end up with
a .img file).



Writing an SD card from OS X
1. Open your Terminal utility (it’s in /Applications/Utilities) to get a command
line prompt
2. Without the card in your computer’s SD card reader, type df -h. The df
program shows your free space, but it also shows which disk volumes
are mounted.
3. Now insert the SD card and run df -h again.
4. Look at the list of mounted volumes and determine which one is the SD
card by comparing it to the previous output. For example, an SD card
mounts on our computer as /Volumes/Untitled, and the device name
is /dev/disk3s1. Depending on the configuration of your computer, this
name may vary. Names are assigned as devices are mounted, so you
may see a higher number if you have other devices or disk images mounted
in the Finder. Write the card’s device name down.
5. To write to the card you’ll have to unmount it first. Unmount it by typing
sudo diskutil unmount /dev/disk3s1 (using the device name you got
from the previous step instead of /dev/disk3s1). Note that you must use
the command line or Disk Utility to unmount. If you just eject it from the
Finder you’ll have to take it out and reinsert it (and you’ll still need to
unmount it from the command line or Disk Utility). If the card fails to
unmount, make sure to close any Finder windows that might be open on
the card.
6. Next you’ll need to figure out the raw device name of the card. Take your
device name and replace disk with rdisk and leave off the s1 (which is
the partition number). For example, the raw device name for the device
/dev/disk3s1 is /dev/rdisk3.
It is really important that you get the raw device name correct!
You can overwrite your hard drive and lose data if you start
writing to your hard drive instead of the SD card. Use df again
to double check before you continue.
7. Make sure that the downloaded image is unzipped and sitting in your
home directory. You’ll be using the Unix utility dd to copy the image bit
by bit to the SD card. Below is the command; just replace the name of
the disk image with the one you downloaded, and replace /dev/rdisk3
with the raw device name of the SD card from step 6.
You can learn more about the command later,  but you’re
essentially telling dd to run as root and copy the input file (if) to the
output file (of).
sudo dd bs=1m if=~/2012-09-18-wheezy-raspbian.img of=/dev/rdisk3
8. It will take a few minutes to copy the whole disk image. Unfortunately dd
does not provide any visual feedback, so you’ll just have to wait. When
it’s done it will show you some statistics; eject the SD card and you’re
ready to try it on the Pi.


Writing an SD card from Windows

1. Download the Win32DiskImager program.(search for this in google )(click here)

                


2. Insert the SD card in your reader and note the drive letter that pops up
in Windows Explorer.
3. Open Win32DiskImager and select the Raspbian disk image.
4. Select the SD card’s drive letter, then click Write. If Win32DiskImager
has problems writing to the card, try reformatting it in Windows Explorer.
5. Eject the SD card and put it in your Raspberry Pi; you’re good to go!

Writing an SD card from Linux

The instructions for Linux are similar to those for the Mac:
1. Open your a new shell and without the card in the reader, type df -h to
see which disk volumes are mounted.
2. Now insert the SD card and run df -h again.
3. Look at the list of mounted volumes and determine which one is the SD
card by comparing it to the previous output. Find the device name, which
should be something like /dev/sdd1. Depending on the configuration of
your computer, this name may vary. Write the card’s device name down.
4. To write to the card you’ll have to unmount it first. Unmount it by typing
umount /dev/sdd1 (using the device name you got from the previous step
instead of /dev/sdd1). If the card fails to unmount, make sure it is not the
current working directory in any open shells.
5. Next you’ll need to figure out the raw device name of the card, which is
the device name without the partition number. For example, if your device
name was /dev/sdd1, the raw device name is /dev/sdd.
It is really important that you get the raw device name correct!
You can overwrite your hard drive and lose data if you start
writing to your hard drive instead of the SD card. Use df again
to double check before you continue.
7. Make sure that the downloaded image is unzipped and sitting in your
home directory. You’ll be using the Unix utility dd to copy the image bit
by bit to the SD card. Below is the command; just replace the name of
the disk image with the one you downloaded, and replace /dev/rdisk3
with the raw device name of the SD card from step 6.
sudo dd bs=1M if=~/2012-09-18-wheezy-raspbian.img of=/dev/sdd
This command tells dd to run as root and copy the input file (if) to the
output file (of).
8. It will take a few minutes to copy the whole disk image. Unfortunately dd
does not provide any visual feedback, so you’ll just have to wait.
When it’s done it will show you some statistics. It should be ok to eject
the disk, but just to make sure it is safe, run sudo sync, which will flush
the filesystem write buffers.
9. Eject the card and insert it in your Raspberry Pi. Good to go!


A second way to get the OS on to an SD Card under is to use the BerryBoot
utility. BerryBoot is part of the BerryTerminal thin client project, and will let
you put multiple operating systems on a single card. You put the BerryBoot(click here
image on an SD card, boot it up on the Raspberry Pi and an interactive installer
allows you to select an OS from a list. Note that you’ll have to be connected
to a network for BerryBoot to work.




           

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Hi guys Sandesh and Rajesh here ... studing engineering in PESIT started this blog as a google contest and also we love blogging ...Hope u like it ...Encourage us by liking us on g+... Any queries dont hesitate to ask Read More →

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